Isotonix®

Digestive Health Kit

Sold by Isotonix®

Isotonix®

Digestive Health Kit

Sold by Isotonix®

HK$850.00 You Save: HK$85.00 (10.0%)

HK$765.00

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Includes 1 Ultimate Aloe™ Juice - Natural Flavor; 1 Isotonix® Digestive Enzyme Powder Drink and 1 NutriClean® Probiotics

In today’s world of processed and fast foods, you are what you eat. With the less than ideal standard Hong Kong diet, the body must work harder to break down food, absorb nutrients and get rid of waste. Maintaining digestive and immune health depends...
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Benefits

  • May help ease occasional upset stomach
  • Provides beneficial bacteria to help maintain optimal bacterial balance
  • Provides enzymes and good bacteria that promote the absorption of nutrients
  • Supports digestive health
  • Helps to support immune health
  • May support digestive comfort
  • Supports bowel health
  • Supports the metabolism of food for better nutrition
  • A 10% savings!

Benefits  

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Details

In today’s world of processed and fast foods, you are what you eat. With the less than ideal standard Hong Kong diet, the body must work harder to break down food, absorb nutrients and get rid of waste. Maintaining digestive and immune health depends on a combination of optimal bacterial balance and maximum nutrient absorption.

Each product in the Digestive Health Kit works synergistically to support digestive comfort, regularity, immune function, proper nutrient absorption and promotes the balance of good bacteria in the gut. Plus, by purchasing the Digestive Health Kit instead of buying these products individually you save 10%!

Digestive enzymes are required for the body to properly absorb and utilize nutrients from food. A lack of digestive enzymes puts additional strain on your system and results in an incomplete digestive process. As you age, the body’s ability to make certain digestive enzymes decreases.

Isotonix® Digestive Enzyme Powder Drink is an isotonic-capable supplement designed to replenish essential digestive enzymes, contributing to good digestive health. 

NutriClean®Probiotics are 10 carefully selected bacterial strains with a unique role to help your body maintain bacterial balance and optimal digestive health. The digestive system is a primary part of immune defense, containing approximately 70 percent of the body’s immune system. Maintaining bacterial balance is a key component of a healthy digestive tract. The digestive tract is home to 400-500 different types of bacteria. These bacteria include both healthy bacteria (probiotics) and potentially unhealthy bacteria.

Maintaining optimal digestive and immune health depends in large part on making sure the good bacteria outnumber the bad. With such tremendous diversity naturally present in the digestive tract, it is important to supplement with not just one strain, but numerous strains of probiotics, so that the most comprehensive benefit is received.

Ultimate Aloe™ Juice is made from aloe vera leaf and retains the qualities of naturally occurring aloe vera through a proprietary extraction process. This aids in supplying critical enzymes and removing the undesirable components such as aloin and emodin that may cause digestive discomfort. Because of this, Ultimate Aloe delivers superior results you can depend on time after time. Studies have shown that aloe consumed orally promotes normal digestion and supports a healthy immune system.

Ingredients

Ultimate Aloe Juice:


Aloe Vera Leaf 

Ultimate Aloe is made from aloe vera leaf which undergoes a unique manufacturing process that carefully removes aloin and aloe-emodin while still maintaining high levels of polysaccharides. The polysaccharides in aloe have been shown to provide many health benefits. The International Aloe Science Council has certified the aloe content and purity in this product. Aloe vera contains vitamins, minerals, triglycerides, carbohydrates, amino acids, enzymes and water. The vitamins found in aloe include B1, B2, B3 and B12, choline, folic acid, vitamin C and beta-carotene (a precursor to Vitamin A), which are all vital to optimal health and the formation of certain key enzymes. Aloe has been shown to contain many beneficial minerals needed for good nutrition. Minerals found in aloe include calcium, magnesium, potassium, chloride, iron, zinc, manganese, copper, chromium, sulfur, boron, silicon, phosphorus, and sodium. These minerals are vital in the growth process and essential for the function of all body systems. Aloe vera also contains necessary triglycerides including fats, oil and waxes. These carry the fat-soluble vitamins and supply the fatty acids essential for growth and general health of the body. Aloe vera contains 20 of the 22 amino acids needed for good nutrition; nine of these are essential and must be supplied from an outside source because the body cannot manufacture its own. Aloe has been shown to contain all of the essential nine amino acids. Aloe vera also contains critical enzymes that trigger the chemical reaction of vitamins, minerals and hormones for normal functioning of the body.


NutriClean Probiotics: 

Clinical research has shown that probiotics support bowel health and much more. Probiotics help maintain a healthy balance of bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract and are increasingly important in the diet as we continue to rely on processed foods. Probiotics help to counter the negative effects that processed foods and numerous other factors may have on the bacterial balance in the gastrointestinal tract.


Lactobacillus plantarum 

L. plantarum has been shown to promote optimal digestive health. L. plantarum competes for nutrients which the unhealthy bacteria live on. It is able to help reduce unhealthy bacteria (naturally present in the body) while preserving vital nutrients, antioxidants and vitamins. One of the talents of L. plantarum is its ability to synthesize L-lysine, an essential amino acid which is required for countless functions in the body.


Lactobacillus acidophilus 

L. acidophilus is one of the most highly studied and widely used probiotic organisms.  It is a strain of lactic acid producing, rod-shaped microbes that have numerous benefits for bowel health. L. acidophilus produces vitamin K, lactase, and anti-microbial substances such as acidolin, acidophilin, lactocidin, and bacteriocin. Due to the multiple functions of this microorganism, scientists have discovered that administering L. acidophilus orally helps maintain the proper balance within the digestive tract. L. acidophilus has been shown to support bowel health. The lactase that L. acidophilus creates is an enzyme that assists in the breakdown of lactose into simple sugars, which can support lactose metabolism.


Lactobacillus rhamnosus 

L. rhamnosus is a strain of probiotics that aids in balancing the gastrointestinal microflora.  It is one of the most intensely studied bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract.  One of the remarkable things about L. rhamnosus is its ability to tolerate and even thrive in the harsh acidic conditions normally found in the stomach. Research has shown that L. rhamnosus helps maintain the integrity of the stomach lining.

 

Lactobacillus salivarius 

L. salivarius resides in the mouth and small intestine. It has been shown to be effective in helping to reduce at least five potentially unhealthy bacteria in the mouth that are involved in producing dental plaque. L. salivarius appears to support homeostasis within the intestines.


Lactobacillus casei 

L. casei is a rod-shaped species of Lactobacillus found in milk, cheese and dairy.  It is a lactic acid producer like other species within the Lactobacillus genus and has been found to assist in the colonization of beneficial bacteria and can help relieve occasional diarrhea. L. casei is active in a broad temperature and pH range. It can be found naturally in the mouth and intestine of humans.  It is a lactase producer which aids in healthy lactose metabolism and promoting bowel health.


Lactobacillus helveticus

L. helveticus has been well studied for many years and is commonly used in the production of Swiss-type cheeses to enhance flavor. Several beneficial probiotic effects are reported such as the ability to survive in the stomach and to reach the intestine alive, helping to support optimal lactose metabolism and helping to minimize the duration of occasional diarrhea.  A number of studies have been conducted in regard to the myriad of potential health benefits offered by L. helveticus


Bfidobacterium bifidum 

Bifidobacterium are rod-shaped microbes that have been identified as the most important organisms in the intestine for providing barrier protection.  Like Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium are lactic acid producing microbes found in fermented foods such as yogurt and cheese. Despite the fact that when we are born Bifidobacterium makes up approximately 95% of the total gut population, the Bifidobacterium population decreases in our intestines as adults and then declines further as we advance in age. B. bifidum is the predominant bacteria strain found in the microflora of breast-fed infants. It is believed that B. bifidum contributes to the bowel health of breast-fed infants.  


Bifidobacterium longum 

B. longum is a branched, rod-shaped bacterium that competes with other bacteria for attachment sites within the bowel. It has a high resistance to gastric acid and shares similar functions as B. bifidum.


 Bifidobacterium breve 

B. breve is another branched, rod-shaped bacterium. The job of B. breve in the bowel is to ferment sugars and produce lactic acid as well as acetic acid. B. breve is a champion among probiotic bacteria due to its superior ability to metabolize many types of food.


Bifidobacterium infantis 

B. infantis is a probiotic bacterium that inhabits the intestine of both infants and adults. According to a study sponsored by P&G Health Sciences Institute and published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, B. infantis may be beneficial for bowel health.  B. infantis plays an important role in basic digestion, proper metabolism and overall well-being.


Isotonix Digestive Enzyme Powder Drink:

Amylase

Amylases are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of alpha-1, 4-glycosidic linkages of polysaccharides to yield dextrins, oligosaccharides, maltose and D-glucose. Amylases are derived from animal, fungal and plant sources.There are a few different amylases. These enzymes are classified according to the manner in which the glysosidic bond is attacked. Alpha-amylases hydrolyze alpha-1, 4-glycosidic linkages, randomly yielding dextrins, oligosaccharides and monosaccharides. Alpha-amylases are endo-amylases. Exoamylases hydrolyze the alpha-1, 4-glycosidic linkage only from the non-reducing outer polysaccharide chain ends. Exoamylases include beta-amylases and glucoamylases (gamma-amylases, amyloglucosidases). Beta-amylases yield beta-limit dextrins and maltose. Gamma-amylases yield glucose. Amylases are used as digestants. Amylase activity is expressed as Dextrinizing Units or DU.

 

Protease

Proteases  are enzymes that break peptide bonds between amino acids in proteins. The process is called proteolytic cleavage, a common mechanism of activation or inactivation of enzymes especially involved in blood coagulation or digestion.

 

Proteases occur naturally in all organisms.

 

Lactase

Lactase  are enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of the disaccharide lactose into constituent galactose and glucose monomers. In humans, lactase is present predominantly along the brush border membrane of the differentiated enterocytes lining the villi of the small intestine. 


Lactase is essential for digestive hydrolysis of lactose in milk. Deficiency of the enzyme causes lactose intolerance; many humans become lactose intolerant as adults.

 

Lipase

A lipase is an  enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ester bonds in lipid substrates. Most lipases act at a specific position on the glycerol backbone of a lipid substrate (A1, A2 or A3). Lipases are ubiquitous throughout living organisms, and genes encoding lipases are even present in certain viruses. Lipases, help in the metabolism, absorption and transport of lipids throughout the body. As biological membranes are integral to living cells and are largely composed of phospholipids, lipases play important roles in cell biology.

 

Cellulase

Cellulase is an enzyme complex which breaks down cellulose to beta-glucose. Aside from herbivores, most animals (including humans) do not produce cellulase in their bodies and are, therefore, unable to use much of the energy contained in plant material.

Cellulose is an indigestible plant polysaccharide. It is the principal constituent of the cell wall of plants. Cellulase has cellulolytic activity, meaning that it hydrolyzes cellulose... Cellulase is used as a digestive aid for the management of flatulence. The activity of cellulase is expressed in cellulose units or CU.

 

Sucrase

Sucrase is the enzyme involved in the hydrolysis of sucrose to fructose and glucose. It is secreted by the tips of the villi of the epithilum in the small intestines. Its levels are reduced in response to villi blunting events such as ciliac sprue. Sucrase increases during pregnancy and lactation as villi hypertrophy.

 

Bacillus Coagulans (Lactosporeä)*
Bacillus Coagulans is a lactic acid bacillus preparation manufactured and distributed by the Sabinsa Corporation. Fermented milks have been a part of the human diet since ancient times. Their efficacy in alleviating gastrointestinal disorders has been exploited in systems of traditional medicine the world over. Lactic acid bacteria, the indigenous microbial flora in fermented milks and natural inhabitants of the human gastrointestinal tract were thought to be responsible for the longevity of their hosts through their curative and prophylactic actions. 


The role of lactic acid bacteria in gastrointestinal microecology has been the subject of extensive research. It is widely believed that these bacteria prevent the growth of putrefactive microorganisms responsible for ill health by competitive inhibition, the generation of a non-conducive acidic environment and/or by the production of bacteriocins. Their metabolites may include B group vitamins.


* Lactospore™ is a trademark of Sabinsa Corporation.


FAQ

What are digestive enzymes? 
Digestive enzymes are special catalytic proteins that help your body break down food to utilize the complete spectrum of nutrients in the food we eat. Unfortunately, food enzymes, which are sensitive to heat, are usually inactivated when food is cooked to serve. This leaves your body with the challenge of trying to break down foods for absorption into your system with no help from the natural enzymes that would otherwise be present in many of the foods we eat. While your body can break down foods with no help, it may put additional strain on your system. Isotonix Digestive Enzyme Powder Drink acts to supplement and maximize the activity of the body’s own enzymes and the "friendly" bacteria our bodies need in an easy-to-take, pleasant-tasting drink. 

Our lifestyles and diets are constantly changing. If the last 25 years are any indication, these changes are not usually for the best. Foods that would otherwise offer us their own added enzymes to help our bodies absorb more nutrients are increasingly processed, heated for extended shelf life and stripped of vital elements. The problem is that in making increasing numbers of foods "safe" for ingestion, we are in some cases making foods less healthy for our systems. This means our bodies now need to work harder to absorb the same nutritional content as it may have just a few years ago. Isotonix Digestive Enzyme Powder Drink  helps your body replenish all the essential enzymes and "good" bacteria necessary for maximum absorption of nutrients from the food we eat.

What are probiotics? 
Probiotics are beneficial organisms that promote a healthy intestinal tract environment. Probiotics can help support the body in maintaining proper digestive functions. These "friendly" bacteria can help the absorption of vitamins and minerals, and can actually synthesize some vitamins, such as biotin and vitamin K. In addition, these beneficial bacteria contribute to the breaking down of fibers and undigested starch into simple sugars. These simple sugars then function as fuel for the cells that line the large intestine. 

What are the "good" bacteria? 
All bacteria are not harmful. In fact, if it were not for "good" bacteria, we would be unable to digest food. Isotonix Digestive Enzyme Powder Drink  contains probiotic bacteria called Bacillus coagulans, designed to help replenish the "good" bacteria that can be harmed by things like the ingestion of antibiotics. These "friendly" bacteria help to repopulate the colon and displace harmful bacteria.  

We all know that chlorine in our water supply kills bacteria, making water safe to drink. That’s good, but all bacteria are not harmful. In fact, if it weren’t for "good" bacteria, we would be unable to digest food. Many people, especially women, know the importance of having "good" bacteria in their system, and many actually take supplements like Lactobacillus acidophilus to keep healthy. Isotonix Digestive Enzyme Powder Drink Formula with Probiotics contains Probiotic bacteria called Bacillus Coagulans Lactobacillus sporogenes, designed to help replenish the "good" bacteria that can be harmed by things like the ingestion of chlorinated water and antibiotics. These "friendly" bacteria help to repopulate the colon, displacing harmful bacteria, and promote an appropriate pH balance.

How does aloe work? 
Aloe vera works because the green skin of the plant produces at least six beneficial health agents: lupeol, salicylic acid, urea nitrogen, cinnamonic acid, phenol and sulfur. In addition, the plant also contains proteins (polypeptides) and at least four mannan sugars, which promote overall health. 

What is the shelf life of Ultimate Aloe?
If unrefrigerated and unopened, Ultimate Aloe will last approximately one year.

Why is the aloin removed from the aloe?
Fresh aloe vera contains aloin, a very powerful laxative, which must be eliminated from the aloe if it is to be used safely as an ingredient in topical products or as a dietary supplement. When aloe is pasteurized and the aloin is eliminated, the aloe is safe for internal use.

I noticed the IASC Seal on the Ultimate Aloe bottles. What is it and what does it mean for me?
The seal is a certificate from the International Aloe Science Council (IASC). It demonstrates that the quality of aloe in Ultimate Aloe has been validated and certified by an independent group of professionals. Market Hong Kong has made a strong commitment to sell a standardized, well-defined, thoroughly tested product that meets the rigid standards of the Council.

Can NutriClean Probiotics be taken with Isotonix Digestive Enzymes? 
Yes, NutriClean Probiotics and Isotonix Digestive Enzymes would complement each other when taken together as part of your daily nutritional supplement regimen. These products should not be taken concurrently. Digestive enzymes should be taken with a meal and Probiotics should be taken on an empty stomach between meals.

Are there any allergens in NutriClean Probiotics? 
NutriClean Probiotics contains trace amounts of milk from the fermentation process. There are less than 2 parts per million (ppm) of milk in each serving. This product is safe for individuals with lactose sensitivity.

How does NutriClean Probiotics affect bowel health?
Diet and supplementing your intestines with probiotics can help support a healthy bowel by providing for a well-balanced intestinal micro flora.

What is LiveBac and why is it important? 
Probiotics are live microorganisms, and must remain live while bottled and when ingested in order to be effective in the digestive tract. However, as sensitive organisms, many of the probiotics in many products die off quickly when bottled. LiveBac helps achieve extended shelf life for probiotics, even at room temperature.

What is Bio-Tract, and why is it important? 
The patented Bio-Tract delivery technology protects probiotic organisms from stomach acid on their way to the bowel.  This allows for live bacteria to be delivery to multiple places in the bowel for the best possible outcome.

Is Digestive Health Kit Safe?
Digestive Health Kit is safe and free of harmful agents. The kit is made in the United States in FDA-inspected facilities using Good Manufacturing Practices. Customers can have confidence in the quality and safety of this kit.

Science

Ultimate Aloe Juice

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NutriClean Probiotics:


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  • Gill, H. and Guarner, F. Probiotics and human health: a clinical perspective. Postgraduate Medical Journal. 80(947): 516-526, 2004.
  • Guarner, F. and Malagelada, J. Gut flora in health and disease. Lancet. 361(9356): 512-519, 2003.
  • Hatakka, K., et al. Probiotics reduce the prevalence of oral candida in the elderly – A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Dental Research. 86(2): 125-130, 2007.
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  • Ljungh, Å., et al. Isolation, selection and characteristics of Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei F19. Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease. 3: 4-6, 2002.
  • Marteau, P., et al. Protection from gastrointestinal diseases with the use of probiotics. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 73(Suppl): 430S-436S, 2001.
  • Parracho, H., et al. Differences between the gut microflora of children with autistic spectrum disorders and that of healthy children. Journal of Medical Microbiology. 54: 987-991, 2005.
  • Rastall, R. et al. Modulation of the microbial ecology of the human colon by probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics to enhance human health: An overview of enabling science and potential applications. FEMS Microbiology Ecology. 52: 145-152, 2005.
  • Roberfroid, M. Prebiotics and probiotics: are they functional foods? American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 71(Suppl): 1682S-1687S, 2000.
  • Rolfe, R. The role of probiotic cultures in the control of gastrointestinal health. Journal of Nutrition. 130: 396S-402S, 2000.
  • Shimauchi, H., et al. Improvement of periodontal condition by probiotics with Lactobacillus salivarius WB21: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Journal of Clinical Peridontology. 35: 897-905, 2008.
  • Szajewska, H. and Mrukowicz, J. Probiotics in the treatment and prevention of acute infectious diarrhea in infants and children: a systematic review of published randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. 33: S17-S25, 2001.
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  •  Wullt, M., et al. Lactobacillus plantarum 299v enhances the concentrations of fecal short chain fatty acids in patients with recurrent Clostridum difficile-associated diarrhea. Digestive Diseases and Sciences. 52: 2082-2086, 2007.

Isotonix Digestive Enzyme Powder Drink:


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